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Sandy

Male | Age unspecified | 3 to 5 minutes
Starts on page 10

Intended for an Indigenous Australian performer

EXTRACT: ..the elders waited for the Mungee, and when they sensed his presence they threw magic powdered bone all over him. It stuck in his hair and on his skin and he couldn't scrub it off. The Mungee was turned into a pale skin and that was his punishment. He would never be able to sneak into the camp to steal the children because he would be seen. And the people would know. And the people would never forget. ..Ruby, I gotta go or the matron will skin me, but remember, it's not the dark you need to be afraid of.


Sandy

Male | Age unspecified | Under 3 minutes
Starts on page 22

Intended for an Indigenous Australian performer

EXTRACT: She used to say that when you walk on the sand, the wind can blow away your footsteps, like you had never made them, and the earth would become pure again. The sand could heal itself. The land where my people come from is covered in red sand and in the old days, the women, to try and stop the white men from raping them, would shove sand inside themselves. Anything to stop the men from raping them, anything. And that's what my mother did, but it didn't stop them and so I came along.

Contains adult themes

Shirley

Female | Age unspecified | Under 3 minutes
Starts on page 35

Intended for an Indigenous Australian performer

EXTRACT: I'll tell you what heals. Holding that itty-bitty little baby. Having Kate call me Mum. The first time she did, right - we were in the hospital - she said, 'Mum, here, hold Tamara for me' - and I didn't even look up! [Softly] No one's ever called me Mum. Then a funny thing happened. The nurse came up and said, 'I'll take the baby now', and I said, 'No, you won't', and I burst into tears like an old fool.